Literary Events

Writers Reading Series

December to March

Wednesdays: 7 - 9 pm

writers read from & discuss their work

Writers in residence will read from and discuss their work Wednesday evenings from December 2019 to March 2020. It’s the perfect mid-week pause to reconnect with meaningful language.

Winter Writers Reading Series events are held Wednesdays, at 7:00 p.m. in the Lind Pavilion, 411 Commerce St. – stop in for snacks, literature, and inspiration!

This is a rare opportunity to engage award-winning authors in small group conversation. Don’t miss out!

2019-2020 Schedule

We are delighted to announce a nearly full schedule has already been confirmed. Details are available below, but the schedule is as follows:

December 18: Robert Russell

January 8: Christina Clancy

January 15: Marilyn Annucci

January 22: Laura Jean Baker

January 29: Steve Fox

February 26: Margaret Rozga

March 4: Kathryn Gahl

March 18: Liam Callanan
CANCELED: we hope to reschedule with the 2021 Winter Writers Reading Series

March 25: William Stobb
CANCELED: rescheduled for the 2021 Winter Writers Reading Series

Other writers and/or open mic nights or special Big Read events may be scheduled on open Wednesdays during the Winter Writers Reading Series. Check back here, follow us on Facebook, or better yet, sign up for the Shake Rag Alley News below and we’ll send you monthly updates!


Our Winter Writers Reading Series Partners

September to November

Now Virtual!

Together with the Mineral Point Public Library and Mineral Point School District libraries, Shake Rag Alley Center for the Arts invites the public to come together during the rescheduled NEA Big Read of “Citizen: An American Lyric” beginning Sept. 24 and running through November.

Originally scheduled for April, a month of activities had been planned around Claudia Rankine’s award-winning innovative work of poetry, prose, and art that addresses the individual and collective effects of racism. But when the COVID-19 pandemic prompted the statewide shutdown this spring, the NEA Big Read was put on hold and a program of free and largely virtual events is being developed for this fall.

“When our NEA Big Read Committee chose ‘Citizen’ from among more than 30 books for its use of poetry and art to explore the impact words have on concepts of identity and inclusion, we could not have anticipated the nationwide protests against systemic racism touched off this summer by George Floyd’s murder in Minneapolis,” said Shake Rag Alley Executive Director Sara Lomasz Flesch. “Claudia Rankine’s book remains as relevant as when it was first published in 2014 and turned a spotlight on the microaggressions that compound the trauma of racism.”

In preparation for the NEA Big Read, free copies of “Citizen” are available to program participants. Copies are available now at the Mineral Point Public Library and at Shake Rag Alley. Additional resources are available on the NEA Big Read page, including reading guides, video lectures and audio recordings of the Virtual Community Conversation series on systemic racism hosted in June-August.

September to November events are mostly virtual and include:

•  Virtual Kick-off Event

•  Guest Talk: Writing About Race

•  Guest Talk: James Baldwin in Paris

•  Book Discussions

•  Women’s Art Parties

• Panel Discussion: Citizen Author and the American Story

•  Youth make-and-take art kits

•  Additional Virtual Community Conversations as they develop

For more information and to register for NEA Big Read events, use the button below, visit our catalog of free events, send an email, or call (608)987-3292.

September 25-27

Friday - Sunday

Now Virtual!

write alongside other writers

Join us for the fourth annual Writing Retreat at Shake Rag Alley, open to writers of all levels. Enrich your talent and prospects in this charming art community and old mining town. Choose one of three genres taught by either Patricia Ann McNair (Memoir and Personal Essay; Retreat Artistic Director), Christine Rice (Short Story), or Shawn Shiflett (The New Novel) for an in-depth workshop that will challenge you across the three days. These workshop directors are award-winning published authors and active, experienced teachers of writing.

Interwoven around these main workshops will be optional and inspiring creative activities, including talks on Writing About Race with Eric May, and Baldwin in Paris with Philip Hartigan, a panel discussion on Alternatives in Publishing, a Faculty and Local Author Reading, Open Mics, and a craft talk on narrative distance with Sarah Hammond that will make for a retreat jam-packed with opportunities to learn, share, network and write.

Manuscript consultations are available with instructors on a first sign up, first served basis, at a very affordable price.

We are pleased to work in partnership with Hypertext Magazine & Studio, a social justice writing nonprofit organization. 

Second Saturday

2 – 4 pm

workshop new poems & deepen your craft

Driftless Poets meet on the second Saturday of each month at 2 pm either virtually via Zoom or on the Shake Rag Alley campus.

New poets are always welcome, but only those who have submitted work one week prior to the workshop will receive feedback and critique. Poets take turns leading the workshops by sharing a poem that demonstrates a form or craft technique and monitoring time.

What to Expect

In a writing workshop, a group of people engage in intensive discussion during a time set aside to focus on and improve one’s craft. Driftless Poets meet monthly to learn from one another by listening carefully to feedback on work submitted to the group.

How to Participate

The Driftless Poets workshops are free and no registration is required, but an email RSVP is appreciated.

For more information: (608) 987-3292.

Readings & Resources

Creative Writing Library

Several shelves of writing related books are available in the Art Cafe. Most are available for circulation, and include:

  • literary & small press journals
  • poetry, fiction &  nonfiction anthologies
  • craft & marketing guides

Meeting outdoors for social distancing.

Winter Writers Reading Series

Since 2011 Shake Rag Alley has partnered with the Council for Wisconsin Writers (CWW), Wisconsin People & Ideas, and the Wisconsin Poet Laureate Commission through the Wisconsin Academy of Sciences, Arts & Letters to offer week-long residencies to their annual writing contest winners.

In the tradition established by Edenfred, the Terry Family Foundation’s artist residence in Madison, writers and poets are provided with a week of uninterrupted time to focus on a project of their choice.

Between the months of December through March, writers stay in Shake Rag Alley’s inspiring lodging facilities surrounded by the nurturing environment of historic Mineral Point’s artistic community. Visiting writers participate in workshops, readings, and/or community outreach activities, including Wednesday evening Winter Writers Reading Series author talks and discussions.

Unless otherwise noted, readings take place in the Lind Pavilion at 411 Commerce St.

About the Council for Wisconsin Writers

CWW is a non-profit membership organization dedicated to promoting local, state, and national awareness of Wisconsin’s great literary heritage and to encouraging excellence among Wisconsin writers today. Founded in 1964, the CWW is operated entirely by volunteer writers, editor, publishers, book sellers, and other supporters who serve on its board of directors. Learn more at wiswriters.org.

About Wisconsin People & Ideas

Wisconsin People & Ideas is the quarterly magazine of the Wisconsin Academy of Sciences, Arts & Letters. The leading magazine of Wisconsin thought and culture, Wisconsin People & Ideas features articles by and about scientists, scholars, artists, writers, policymakers and others who serve as thought leaders in Wisconsin. The magazine also publishes works from contemporary and classic Wisconsin artists, writers, and poets. More information can be found at wisconsinacademy.org.

2020-21 Winter Writers Reading Series Under Development - Watch for Updates

December 9

Matt Blessing

Council for Wisconsin Writers
Kay W. Levin Award for Short Nonfiction

“Alaska Ho!  Arville Schaleben and the Matanuska Valley Colony,” appeared in the winter 2019 issue of The Wisconsin Magazine of History. Printed copies of the magazine are available in every public library across Wisconsin.
 
Here is a link to the digitized version of the article:
 

December 16

David Southward

Council for Wisconsin Writers
Lorine Niedecker Poetry Award

five poems published in various journals

January 6

Krista Eastman

Council for Wisconsin Writers
Norbert Blei/August Derleth Nonfiction Book Award

The Painted Forest published by West Virginia University Press

February 10 & 17

Kimberly Blaeser

Council for Wisconsin Writers
Zona Gale Short Fiction Award &
Edna Meudt Poetry Book Award

“Vision Confidence Score” published in Cutthroat: A Journal of the Arts

Copper Yearning published by Holy Cow! Press

 

March 10

William Stobb

Council for Wisconsin Writers
Zona Gale Short Fiction Award

William Stobb is a poet and fiction writer, professor, editor, and audio art enthusiast. He holds a Ph. D. in Rhetoric, and works as Associate Professor of English at the University of Wisconsin, La Crosse. He is also part of the editorial team at Conduit magazine and its book publishing arm, Conduit Books & Ephemera.

William Stobb was awarded the 2018 Zona Gale Award for Short Fiction for his short story, “All the Bodies,” published in North Dakota Quarterly. His 2020 writer residency at Shake Rag Alley was rescheduled due to coronavirus concerns and he has graciously agreed to participate in the 2020 Winter Writers Reading Series.

His work can be read online here.

​This is a story about bodies. Bodies that live, bodies that die, bodies that sleep, that swim, that kill, that are killed. The lyric pace of William Stobb’s prose seamlessly weaves each detail into a plot that’s both poignant and painful. Bodies don’t last forever. Life is tragic, short, and beautiful. This is a story to read and to remember. I won’t soon forget it.
Jill Alexander Essbaum; Austin, TX

The Zona Gale Award for Short Fiction goes to the best piece of short fiction published by a Wisconsin-based author in the previous year. Read more about the award.

March 17

Thomas Davis

Council for Wisconsin Writers
Edna Ferber Fiction Book Award

In the Unsettled Homeland of Dreams (All Things That Matter Press), Thomas Davis’s fourth published novel, won the 2019 Edna Ferber Fiction Award sponsored by the Wisconsin Council for Writers.  In addition to his four novels Davis has had two epic poems, The Weirding Storm, A Dragon Epic (Bennison Books) and An American Spirit, An American Epic (Four Windows Press), published along with one non-fiction book about the Menominee Tribe’s sustainable forestry, Sustaining the Forest, the People, and the Spirit (State University of New York Press).

Two new books are currently in the production process:  Meditations on the Ceremonies of Beginning, poetry written during the early years of the founding of two significant movements in education, the tribal college and universities movement in the United States and the World Indigenous Nations Higher Education Consortium, which will be published by Tribal College Press and Apples for the Wild Stallion, a young adult novel with an severely autistic hero who cannot talk, which All Things That Matter Press is bringing out.

During his distinguished career as an educator, Davis worked for six tribal colleges across the United States in leadership positions and was a leader in STEM education both in Wisconsin and nationally.   He has written grants for tribal colleges and Wisconsin tribes, served as He helped found College of the Menominee Nation in Keshena, Wisconsin and served as President or Chief Academic Officer of Lac Courtes Oreilles Ojibwa Community College in Hayward, Wisconsin, Fond du Lac Tribal and Community College in Cloquet, Minnesota, and Little Priest Tribal College in Winnebago, Nebraska.  Before retirement, he served as Provost for Navajo Technical University, which has campuses in the Navajo Nation in New Mexico and Arizona.  At Bay Mills Community College in Northern, Michigan, he worked with Indian Head Start to develop one of the first degree-granting virtual colleges in the United States.  He has helped found a number of national and international projects and organizations that have affected the lives of American Indians and indigenous peoples from around the world. 

A 12 series podcast about his work with tribal colleges and universities is currently available at https://tribalcollegejournal.org/our-history-memories-of-the-tribal-college-movement-podcast-1/tom-davis-podcast.

Before the Civil War a community of black families settled at West Harbor on Washington Island.  One of the greatest mysteries in Door County revolves around where the black pioneers came from and what happened to them.  The community disappeared a long time ago.

Thomas Davis’s new historical novel, In the Unsettled Homeland of Dreams, tells a fictional story about how the seven black families got to Washington Island via the Underground Railroad. 

Then it tells the story of how the largest black community outside of Milwaukee at the time created a fisherman community under the leadership of the charismatic black preacher Tom Bennett, a veteran of the War of 1812.

The hero of the story, Joshua Simpson, is a fourteen year old who has been severely whipped by the Overseer of the Bulrush Plantation in the boot heel of Missouri when the story starts.  His mother, Mary Simpson, insists that he go with her to a church meeting held beneath a giant cypress tree in the Mingo Swamp even though Joshua can barely move because of cuts and bruises on his back.

Joshua’s world is turned upside down when he follows his mother where his father, Jason Billings, whom he had never met and was not sure existed, appears out of the darkness.  Then he discovers that Preacher Bennett, a man with a Biblical prophet’s powerful presence, has gathered his swamp congregation together so that they can attempt to escape through the swamp to a place he describes as New Jerusalem.

The drama that follows is unrelenting as events, drawn partially from the literature on the Underground Railroad and slave narratives, complicate Joshua’s and the escaped slaves’ desperate attempts to reach Washington Island.

The novel’s narrative about the slaves’ effort to settle at West Harbor on the island presents a number of historical figures that settled Washington Island, including Jesse Miner, the son of Henry Miner who helped establish the island as a Township of Door County.  The younger Miner wrote a rough biography that provides most of the historical knowledge we have about West Harbor’s black settlement. 

Even the role of Green Bay’s Union Congregational Church and Wisconsin’s Stockbridge Native American Tribe in the Underground Railroad is explored as part of the larger story of racism in the United States.

In her review of the novel, the historical novelist Diane Denton wrote, “This important and moving story of a black fishing community of West Harbor, Washington Island, Wisconsin, insists that the savagery of slavery can be—must be—obstructed. Mr. Davis speaks to the need for all human beings to live freely, individually, uniquely while forming families, friendships, and community; to be at liberty to compete and cooperate, to feel love returned and even unrequited, to know how life is naturally given and taken, to enjoy the refuge of home, to have work and leisure and an education, to make plans and pursue hopes and dreams.”

March 24

Dean Robbins

Council for Wisconsin Writers
Tofte/Wright Children's Literary Award

The Astronaut Who Painted the Moon: The True Story of Alan Bean published by Scholastic

past writers in residence

2019

Marilyn Annucci

Council for Wisconsin Writers Edna Meudt Poetry Book Award

Marilyn Annucci’s writing has appeared in numerous journals and anthologies, including Prairie Schooner, Rattle, North American Review, and Indiana Review. Her collection of poems, The Arrows That Choose Us, won the 2018 Press 53 Poetry Award and the Council of Wisconsin Writers’ Edna Meudt Poetry Book Award. She is also the author of Luck, a chapbook of poems from Parallel Press, and Waiting Room, winner of the 2012 Sunken Garden Poetry Prize. Originally from Massachusetts, she worked for ten years as a writer and editor before earning an MFA from the University of Pittsburgh. She is a professor in the Department of Languages and Literatures at the University of Wisconsin-Whitewater.

Laura Jean Baker

Council for Wisconsin Writers Norbert Blei/August Derleth Nonfiction Book Award

Raised by therapists, married to a defense attorney, Laura Jean Baker writes where mental health, crime, and family intersect. She earned her M.F.A. in creative writing from the University of Michigan, where she was a Colby Fellow.

Her essays have appeared at The Washington Post, Salon, Longreads, and Scary Mommy. Her poetry and memoir writing have appeared in literary journals such as The Gettysburg Review; Confrontation; The Connecticut Review; Third Coast; The Cream City Review; Alaska Quarterly Review; So To Speak: A Feminist Journal of Literature and Art; War, Literature, and the Arts: An International Journal of the Humanities; and Calyx: A Journal of Art and Literature.

Her work has been twice nominated for a Pushcart Prize, and her essay “Year of the Tiger” was a Notable Essay in Best American Essays 2013. Her memoir, The Motherhood Affidavits, was released by The Experiment in April 2018. It has been reviewed or mentioned in The New York Times, The Toronto Star, Kirkus Reviews, Library Journal, Shondaland, Electric Literature, and Medium.nShe is currently at work on her second book.

Liam Callanan

Council for Wisconsin Writers Edna Ferber Fiction Book Award

Liam was born in Washington, DC and grew up in Los Angeles, but now calls Wisconsin home, and roots for every last one of its teams, especially the Brewers.

He is the author of two previous novels — The Cloud Atlas, an Edgar Award finalist set in WWII Alaska, and All Saints, set in a beachfront high school in California, as well as a short story collection, Listen and Other Stories. He teaches in the English department of the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, and also writes shorter things, including essays and public radio commentaries. He doesn’t write poetry, but envies those who do, and is generally a big fan, which is how he came to create and co-executive produce the Poetry Everywhere animated film series, which you can view on iTunes and Youtube, and founded the Eat Local::Read Local program, which distributes local poets’ poems to diners at local restaurants during National Poetry Month.

Christina Clancy

Council for Wisconsin Writers Kay W. Levin Award for Short Nonfiction

Christina Clancy lives with her very tall husband John in Madison, Wisconsin, in a 104-yr old Prairie-style home, which means no repair is simple or cheap. As her brother-in-law says, the house makes him tired. She and her husband have a guesthouse, or “granny cottage,” they run as an Airbnb, so she is no stranger to second homes.

Her debut novel, The Second Home, will be published June, 2020, St. Martin’s Press. The novel reflects her obsession with old houses, family, Cape Cod and summer vacation. 

Although Christina loves old houses, instead of fixing them she’d rather spend time with her children, Olivia and Tim, or write, run, cycle, SUP, practice yoga and follow politics. She is a certified spin instructor, and serves on the board of Wisconsin Conservation Voters.

In 2011, Christina received a PhD in Creative Writing from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee with a specialty in eco-criticism and suburban literature, and taught creative writing at Beloit College. She goes by Dr. Clancy when vying for a hotel room upgrade; but prefers to be called Christina or Christi. 

Steve Fox

Wisconsin Academy of Sciences, Arts & Letters People & Ideas Fiction Contest Winner

Steve Fox’s work has appeared in or has been recognized by Narrative Magazine, The Masters Review, The Iowa Review, Midwestern Gothic, and The Midwest Review. Steve’s work was selected winner of the Wisconsin Writers Association Jade Ring Competition, the Great Midwest Writing Contest, the Midwestern Gothic Summer Flash Fiction Contest, and Wisconsin Academy of Sciences, Arts, & Letters Fiction Competition. Steve lives with his wife, three boys and one dog in Hudson, Wisconsin and studies creative writing at The Loft Literary Center in Minneapolis. He gets up on Monday morning and goes to bed later that day on Saturday night.

Kathryn Gahl

Council for Wisconsin Writers Lorine Niedecker Poetry Award

Kathryn Gahl is a writer, dancer, and registered nurse. Born to an Irish nurse and German farmer, she grew up with seven siblings in a farmhouse located at the end of a half-mile gravel drive. She earned a B.S. in English at the University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point and a B.S. in Nursing at Syracuse University (NY). After 25 years in nursing and nursing management, she became a full-time writer, studying at Bread Loaf, Stonecoast, Sewanee, Iowa Writers’ Workshop Fiction Intensive, Iowa Summer Festival, Vermont College, and Taos.

Her poems and stories are widely published in small journals, including Eclipse, Hawaii Pacific Review, Permafrost, Porcupine Literary Arts Magazine, and Willow Review. Twice a Glimmer Train finalist, she received honorable mention from The Council of Wisconsin Writers and Wisconsin People & Ideas. Margie named her a finalist for the Marjorie J. Wilson Award. Other finalist awards include poetry at Lumina and Chautauqua , the Arthur Edelstein Prize for Short Fiction, the William Richey Short Story Winner, and the Flash Fiction finalist at Talking Writing.

Mother of two young adults and Oma to one, she loves red lipstick, the tango, and home cooking. Her readings have been described as “lively and pulsating. Even if you don’t like poetry, you will get goosebumps when you hear Kathryn.” She participates in Reading Buddies, a Wisconsin program supplying readers and picture books to preschoolers.

Gahl recently finished her first novel (hooray)! Inspiration flows from her father, who would have been a writer if it weren’t for frozen barn pipes, sows farrowing at midnight, rust in the wheat field, cows breaking into the raspberry patch, and eight children wanting lunch money. That, and his devotion to his wife and Saturday night dance partner, Kathryn’s mother.

Margaret Rozga

Wisconsin Poet Laureate

Life-long Wisconsin resident Margaret Rozga, Wisconsin Poet Laureate for 2019–2020, lives in Milwaukee. She earned her BA at Alverno College and an MA and PhD in English at the University of Wisconsin–Milwaukee. An emeritus professor of English at the University of Wisconsin–Waukesha, she continues to teach a poetry workshop for Continuing Education at what is now the UWM–Waukesha campus.

Rozga’s poems draw on her experiences and interests as an educator, avid reader and researcher, parent, and advocate for social and racial justice. Her first book, 200 Nights and One Day (Benu Press 2009), was awarded a bronze medal in poetry in the 2009 Independent Publishers Book Awards and named an outstanding achievement in poetry for 2009 by the Wisconsin Library Association.

Rozga has published three additional collections of poems: Though I Haven’t Been to Baghdad (Benu Press 2012), named an outstanding achievement in poetry for 2012 by the Wisconsin Library Association; Justice Freedom Herbs (Word Tech Press 2015); and Pestiferous Questions: A Life in Poems (Lit Fest Press 2017). Research for Pestiferous Questions was supported by a creative writer’s fellowship at the American Antiquarian Society. 

Rozga has also been a resident at the Sitka Center for Art and Ecology and at the Ragdale Foundation. Her work was nominated for inclusion in the 2005 Best New Poets anthology and for a Pushcart Prize.

Rozga served as an editor for three poetry chapbook anthology projects, most recently Where I Want to Live: Poems for Fair and Affordable Housing (Little Bird Press 2018), a project of the 50th anniversary commemoration of Milwaukee’s fair housing marches. Her poetry craft essays have appeared in the Whale Road Review, the Wisconsin Fellowship of Poets Museletter and other venues. Her poems have been included in eight collaborative exhibits with visual artists and other poets.

Rozga reviews poetry books and has served as a judge for poetry and writing contests for in Wisconsin and nationally. She serves on the program committee for the Southeast Wisconsin Festival of Books. She especially enjoys offering poetry workshops for middle and high school students.

Robert Russell

Wisconsin Academy of Sciences, Arts & Letters People & Ideas Poetry Contest Winner

Robert Russell is a recovering economist currently living in Madison. For over ten years he was co-producer of the “Radio Literature” program on WORT-FM, and was coordinator for the CheapAtAnyPrice poetry series. Russell led the Madison National Poetry Slam teams from 1992 to 1994, and has taught poetry in high schools and colleges here and abroad. His short fiction and poetry have been published in various literary magazines and anthologies, and his chapbook, Witness, is available on Amazon.

2018

Paula Dáil
Council for Wisconsin Writers
Norbert Blei/August Derleth Nonfiction Book Award

Nicholas Gulig
Wisconsin Academy of Sciences, Arts & Letters
People & Ideas Poetry Contest Winner

Karla Huston
Wisconsin Poet Laureate

Catherine Jagoe
Council for Wisconsin Writers
Edna Meudt Poetry Book Award

Rachel Davidson Leigh
Council for Wisconsin Writers
Tofte/Wright Children’s Literature Award

Patricia Skalka
Council for Wisconsin Writers
Edna Ferber Fiction Book Award

David Southward
Council for Wisconsin Writers
Lorine Niedecker Poetry Award

Bob Wake
Wisconsin Academy of Sciences, Arts & Letters
People & Ideas Fiction Contest Winner

Carolyn Kott Washburne
Council for Wisconsin Writers
Kay W. Levin Short Nonfiction Award

Liz Wyckoff
Council for Wisconsin Writers
Zona Gale Short Fiction Award

2017

John Gurda
Council for Wisconsin Writers
Norbert Blei/August Derleth Nonfiction Book Award

Karen Loeb
Wisconsin Academy of Sciences, Arts & Letters
People & Ideas Poetry Contest Winner

Judith Claire Mitchell
Council for Wisconsin Writers
Edna Ferber Fiction Book Award

Gayle Rosengren
Council for Wisconsin Writers
Tofte/Wright Children’s Literature Award

Allison Slavick
Wisconsin Academy of Sciences, Arts & Letters
People & Ideas Fiction Contest Winner

Ron Wallace
Council for Wisconsin Writers
Edna Meudt Poetry Book Award

John Walser
Council for Wisconsin Writers
Lorine Niedecker Poetry Award

2016

Margaret Benbow
Council for Wisconsin Writers
Zona Gale Short Fiction Award

Chloe Krug Benjamin
Council for Wisconsin Writers
Edna Ferber Fiction Book Award

Bridget Birdsall
Council for Wisconsin Writers
Tofte/Wright Children’s Literature Award

Sean Bishop
Council for Wisconsin Writers
Edna Meudt Poetry Book Award

Kimberly Blaeser
Wisconsin Poet Laureate

Cathryn Cofell
Council for Wisconsin Writers
Lorine Niedecker Poetry Award

John Hildebrand
Council for Wisconsin Writers
Norbert Blei/August Derleth Nonfiction Book Award

Nikki Kallio
Wisconsin Academy of Sciences, Arts & Letters
People & Ideas Fiction Contest Winner

Lisa Vihos
Wisconsin Academy of Sciences, Arts & Letters
People & Ideas Poetry Contest Winner

2015

A.M. Bostwick
Council for Wisconsin Writers
Tofte/Wright Children’s Literature Award

Max Garland
Wisconsin Poet Laureate

B.J. Hollars
Council for Wisconsin Writers
Norbert Blei/August Derleth Nonfiction Book Award

Amaud Jamal Johnson
Council for Wisconsin Writers
Edna Meudt Poetry Book Award

Dion Kempthorne
Wisconsin Academy of Sciences, Arts & Letters
People & Ideas Poetry Contest Winner

Jesse Lee Kercheval
Council for Wisconsin Writers
Edna Ferber Fiction Book Award

Jeanie Tomasko
Council for Wisconsin Writers
Lorine Niedecker Poetry Award

Craig Reinbold
Council for Wisconsin Writers
Kay W. Levin Short Nonfiction Award

2014

Shauna Singh Baldwin
Wisconsin Academy of Sciences, Arts & Letters
People & Ideas Fiction Contest Winner

David McGlynn
Council for Wisconsin Writers
Norbert Blei/August Derleth Nonfiction Book Award

2013

Sarah Busse
Council for Wisconsin Writers
Lorine Niedecker Poetry Award

Lydia Conklin
Council for Wisconsin Writers
Zona Gale Short Fiction Award

Bruce Dethlefsen
Wisconsin Poet Laureate

C X Dillihunt
Wisconsin Academy of Sciences, Arts & Letters
People & Ideas Poetry Contest Winner

Kathleen Ernst
Council for Wisconsin Writers
Edna Ferber Fiction Book Award

Adam Fell
Council for Wisconsin Writers
Edna Meudt Poetry Book Award

Mary Ellen Gabriel
Council for Wisconsin Writers
Kay W. Levin Short Nonfiction Award

Janet Halfmann
Council for Wisconsin Writers
Tofte/Wright Children’s Literature Award

Jill Stukenberg
Wisconsin Academy of Sciences, Arts & Letters
People & Ideas Fiction Contest Winner

Hold Your Own Events at Shake Rag Alley

Choose your favorite historical building, the spacious Lind Pavilion, lush gardens & outdoor spaces, Alley Stage, or the entire campus!

Campus Map: Shake Rag Alley Center for the Arts

Coach House
18 Shake Rag Street


1 of 32

Art Café


2 of 32

Ellery House

3 of 32

restrooms

4 of 32
restrooms 5 of 32

Open Air Parking

6 of 32

Lind Pavilion Parking

7 of 32
Roadside Parking
allowed on Commerce Street 8 of 32

Smejas’ Studio parking

9 of 32

Smejas’ Studio
30 Doty Street

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Curbside Parking
as indicated 11 of 32

Accessible Parking
with curb cut

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Alley Stage

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Cabinet Shop


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French Cabin


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1830 Log Cabin


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Potter’s House


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Blacksmith Barn


18 of 32

Federal Spring

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Monarch Garden

20 of 32

Lind Pavilion
411 Commerce Street

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two blocks to

High Street & Commerce Street
Restaurants, Shops & Galleries

22 of 32
To Grocery Store
Point Foods
622 Dodge Street 23 of 32

Street Parking with Additional Parking behind Smejas’ Studio

24 of 32
The Green
open air park 25 of 32
Stair Steps
between
Cabinet Shop & Lind Pavilion 26 of 32
Stair Steps
to Alley Stage 27 of 32
Stone Bridge
over
Federal Spring 28 of 32

Roland’s Loft

223 Commerce St.

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The Tuckpoint

223 Commerce St.

30 of 32

The Sardeson Pottery Studio

225 Commerce St.

31 of 32

Weaving & Fiber Arts Studio

Cannery Row Arts Incubator
121 Water St.

32 of 32

ADA compliant buildings: Lind Pavilion, Coach House, Smejas’ Studio